The portrayal of the puritanical society in the scarlet letter

Further, the brook acts as a mirror, reflecting Pearl's pointing to Hester's letter, insisting that she return it to her bosom, again becoming a "melancholy brook. Unfortunately, he dies on the spot after admitting his secret, so he never gets a chance to set the unbelievers straight.

Hawthorne's viewpoint of this society seems to be disclosed in several places in the novel but never more so than in the Governor's house in Chapter 7 and during the New England holiday in Chapter They are taught one way only, from the Bible, and any other way would be a sin to them.

June 14, in: They believed men were head of the household and made all important decisions, while women were just there to take care of housework. If he is to remain true to himself and honest, as Hester says he must for his conscience's sake, then he must go back to the world in which he is comfortable, even if it eventually means his public humiliation and death.

Contrast to Puritan Society From the onset of the narrative about Hester Prynne, the contrast of the beauty of nature set against the harshness of Puritanical law is apparent with the juxtaposition of the weatherbeaten prison door with the rusted latch against the lovely wild rosebush Hawthorne expresses that the Puritans are quick to place blame on one another.

Truly, there is, both in the Scripture and the statute book. Pathetic Fallacy The attribution of human qualities to nature In Chapter 18, Hawthorne writes of the " The rest, known as the "unregenerate," would be damned eternally. Pathetic Fallacy The attribution of human qualities to nature In Chapter 18, Hawthorne writes of the " These "iron men and their rules" provide a backdrop for Hawthorne's story that keeps the conflict alive because public appearances and penance were dramatically important parts of the Puritan community.

However, these women say it is not enough.

The Scarlet Letter; A Criticism of Puritan Beliefs

Take heed how thou deniest to him — who, perchance, hath not the courage to grasp it for himself — the bitter, but wholesome, cup that is now presented to thy lips! She had dark and abundant hair, so glossy that it threw off the sunshine with a gleam, and a face which, besides being beautiful from regularity of feature and richness of complexion, had the impressiveness belonging to a marked brow and deep black eyes.

In a speech filled with hypocrisy and desiring to force Hester to make the decision about his public confession, he challenges her to reveal his name: Hawthorne, of course, presents the irony of this concept when he describes the prison as a building already worn when the colony is only fifteen years old.

The Scarlet Letter shows his attitude toward these Puritans of Boston in his portrayal of characters, his plot, and the themes of his story. The novel begins with Esther emerging from prison holding Pearl, her illegitimate baby whom she had borne out of an act of adultery.

They feared Indian attacks and had to survive lethal diseases, starvation, and the harsh New England winters. On the other hand, the society built by the Puritans was stern and repressive, with little room for individualism.

Their dress, their behavior, and even the happiness on their faces is very un-Puritan-like. They were expected to be, like their mothers, good wives and mothers and to uphold the puritan belief systems. And, in fact, she says, "Many a church-member saw I, walking behind the music, that has danced in the same measure with me.

Hawthorne repeats again and again throughout The Scarlet Letter the cruelty, judgmental attitude, narrow-mindedness, and numerous unlikable features of the Puritans.

He shows them as condemning sinners mercilessly, refusing to accept ideas that are foreign to their ways of living or thinking, and being physically — and inwardly — ugly. The rules governing the Puritans came from the Bible, a source of spiritual and ethical standards.

This great family structure kept everyone in line with God, and adultery or any kind of sexual sin was shunned severely.

They feared Indian attacks and had to survive lethal diseases, starvation, and the harsh New England winters. Consider the description he gives of them in his Custom House preface.

The meeting between Dimmesdale and Hester takes place in the forest, away from the stern, repressive laws of society.

Esther does not hold her head in shame or seem remorseful, leading many of her critics to believe that she did not see the need to be sorry for her actions. Then let the magistrates, who have made it of no effect, thank themselves if their own wives and daughters go astray!

Their chief complaints were that the services should be simpler and that religion should contain an intense spiritual relationship between the individual and God.

It almost elevates the witches as heroes, and the Puritan judges who condemned them as the cruel, merciless enemies. Why does his secret cause him so much pain? The novel begins with Esther emerging from prison holding Pearl, her illegitimate baby whom she had borne out of an act of adultery.

Imagery --In the first chapter, nature presents imagery connotative of the harshness of Puritan justice: The irony of public appearance and private knowledge are themes throughout this story.Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Diction of The Scarlet Letter The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne presents the reader with the harsh, life changing conflicts of three Puritan characters during the 17th century.

The Scarlet Letter; A Criticism of Puritan Beliefs

Hester Prynne, Arthur Dimmesdale, and Robert Chillingworth must endure their different, yet surprisingly similar struggles as the novel progresses.

he thought The Scarlet Letter was too short to print by itself The prison door best represents what? Puritanical severity of law and the authority of the regime.

Oct 05,  · The Scarlet Letter is not only about Hester’s sin but also about the unfair and harsh nature of Puritan society. First, Hawthorne begins with discussing how judgemental the Puritans are of other religions and toward those being punished.

Hawthorne's portrayal of life in puritanical society is an ongoing theme present in all of his writings. Without his use of light and dark, the moral convictions and values of the themes and plots would not be so elegantly interpreted into more than just words.

The Scarlet Letter What is ironic about hawthorne's portrayal of the Puritan society, in terms of this developing theme? Chapter Asked by BlueFish on 9/16/ PM Last updated by jill d # on 9/16/ PM Answers 1 Add Yours.

Portrayal of Puritan Society in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Essay - Portrayal of Puritan Society in Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter In the introductory sketch to Nathaniel Hawthorne's novel the "The Scarlet Letter", the reader is informed that one of the author's ancestors persecuted the Quakers harshly.

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The portrayal of the puritanical society in the scarlet letter
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